[10] They typically inhabit conifer forests, such as ponderosa and sugar pine forests in Arizona, Abies common fir forests, oak, and pine forests in central Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras. Yes, Aaron (in Akron, OH), the 52nd AOU Checklist Supplement approved and published in 2011 lists the following wood-warbler changes to species names (INCLUDING the scientific name change for the wood-warbler shown in the nearby photo, the common name of which is the answer for the one-click quiz on the left side. These forests range from humid to semi-arid. In the femal… [3] The male sings throughout the year, with the frequency of the singing increasing in late winter and reaching a peak in early spring. Nevertheless, some birds remain in the northern areas of their range year round. In forests of pine, fir, and oak in southwestern mountains, the Olive Warbler is common in summer and sometimes remains through winter. In spite of being assigned to its own genus in 1875, its affinities were a source of contention. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google. [5] The olive warbler is a long-winged bird. Male Olive Warblers breeding at the northern edge of their range take 2 … As soon-to-be Dr. Lin-Moore explained in his proposal, Ocotero is: “a name already commonly used throughout much of its range in Mexico and northern Central America. The currently-named Olive Warbler (Peucedramus taeniatus) is neither olive-colored nor a warbler. In addition to differences in size, plumage varies geographically as well, with southern birds having more brightly coloured plumage. Sign Up; Logout; Sign In; Your login: Password: Stay signed in Enter your login name or your email address and click on Send reminder to receive a reminder by email. In April 2019, Alexander Lin-Moore from Yale University submitted a proposal to the American Ornithological Society - the body that regulates English common names of birds - to change the common name of P. taeniatus to Ocotero. During the year the male sings the most during the midmorning, but during spring the male sings constantly during mornings and late afternoon. The olive warbler or ocotero (Peucedramus taeniatus) is a small passerine bird. [10], The olive warbler is a bird of mountains and highlands. A great many birders and scientists do not like this ridiculous name. It is the only member of the genus Peucedramus and the family Peucedramidae. As soon-to-be Dr. … Ocotero is derived from ocote, a common Spanish term for various species of Latin American coniferous trees in the genus Pinus, which comprise a major and essential component of the habitat of P. taeniatus.” The petition included a great many examples of other similar name changes accepted by the AOS, including  birds such as the Ocotero that were monotypic (the only species) in their families that had similar name changes, birds whose names did not reflect their appearance or habitat, etc. The male's head and breast are "tawny-orange",[3] and there is a black patch through the eye. As it searches for insects high in the trees, it might seem like a typical warbler, aside from its soft whistled callnote and the copper-colored head of the adult male. [5] The shape of the basihyal bone in the skull, and aspects of its behaviour led to the suggestion that it was instead an Old World warbler in the family Sylviidae. [10], Over most of its range the species is resident, but there is evidence that the most northerly populations are partial migrants. In April 2019, Alexander Lin-Moore from Yale University submitted a proposal to the American Ornithological Society - the body that regulates English common names of birds - to change the common name of P. taeniatus to Ocotero. The plumageof the male is mostly grey body with some olive-green on the wings and two white wing bars. American Ornithological Society: Reconsider the proposal for Ocotero (aka “Olive Warbler”) [7], The generic name of the olive warbler, Peucedramus, is derived from the Greek peuke for a fir tree and dromos for runner, (from trekho, meaning run), a reference to its feeding habitat and behaviour. [4] It lays 3–4 eggs in a tree nest. But since the within-rules process was denied, we are calling on AOS for a reconsideration. No specific information exists about the actual prey species taken, except that they will take the larvae of Tortricidae moths. [10], "Systematic and ecologic notes on the Olive Warbler", "Olive Warblers in the San Francisco Mountains, Arizona", 10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[14:SEOPNC]2.0.CO;2, "New records of birds in the cloud forest of northeastern Hidalgo, Mexico", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Olive_warbler&oldid=984928248, Native birds of the Southwestern United States, Taxa named by Bernard du Bus de Gisignies, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 22 October 2020, at 22:56. The currently-named Olive Warbler (Peucedramus taeniatus) is neither olive-colored nor a warbler. Please sign this petition and add your voice to those who have been calling for this sensible name change for this beautiful little bird - a name that will also honor the local people who share its range. Welcome Guest. [10], The olive warbler is distributed from the southwestern United States to Nicaragua, making it the only bird family endemic to North America. It has been suggested that they are either "down slope migrants", moving to lower elevations, or dispersive, as some records show their presence in Texas. DNA–DNA hybridization placed the olive warbler as an early branch of the finch clade (which included the finches, cardinals and Hawaiian honeycreepers) and the New World sparrow clade (which includes the tanagers, icterids and New World warblers),[6] and a 1998 study of mitochondrial DNA confirmed its status as being far removed from the New World warblers. Though it is often said to be non-migratory,[3] most New Mexican birds leave the state from November to late February. Song is usually delivered from the canopy or other tall trees.