Whether such hydroxides behave as acids or bases depends on the surrounding solution’s pH. The molecular formula identifies each type of element by its chemical symbol and identifies the number of atoms of each element found in one discrete molecule of the substance. While the harmonized list covers many hazardous substances, other ones not listed may also meet the classification criteria in accordance with the CLP. 328º; B.P. 2(b)(i), Directive 98/24/EC on Protection of Workers from Chemical Agent-related Risks, 5 May 1998 (Table 3 of Annex VI to CLP, as amended), EU. Annex III contains applications exempted from the restriction in Article 4(1), while Annex IV lists applications exempted from the restriction in Article 4(1) specific to medical devices and monitoring and control instruments. The quality and correctness of the information submitted to ECHA remains the responsibility of the data submitter. If at least one company has indicated that the substance classification is affected by impurities or additives, this will be indicated by an informative sentence. Harmonised classification and labelling is a legally binding classification and labelling for a substance, agreed at European Community level. [1] Like its tin analog Sn(OH)4, Pb(OH)4 has not been isolated. ECHA has no public registered data indicating whether or in which chemical products the substance might be used. The Prior Informed Consent Regulation administers the import and export of certain hazardous chemicals and places obligations on companies who wish to export these chemicals to non-EU countries. Use descriptors are adapted from ECHA guidance to improve readability and may not correspond textually to descriptor codes described in Chapter R.12: Use Descriptor system of ECHA Guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment. Aluminum hydroxide. If a substance is classified under multiple CLH entries, a link to the C&L Inventory is provided to allow users to view CLH information associated with the substance and no text is automatically generated for the InfoCard. Member states must permit all qualifying facilities in order to ensure that they minimize impact on the environment. Additionally, if available, information on the use of the substance and how consumers and workers are likely to be exposed to it can also be displayed here. Substances indicated, in 2009, as being intended to be registered by at least one company in the EEA. For a detailed overview on identified uses and environmental releases, please consult the registered substance factsheet. Emission Limit Values: Annexes V (combustion plants), VI (waste incineration/co-incineration plants), VIII (TiO2 installations), Dir. The database represents a non-exhaustive list of such substances based on: 1) agents of risk groups 3 and 4 under Directive 2000/54/EC; 2) Table 3 of Annex VI to the CLP Regulation; 3) and Annex I of Directive 2004/37/EC. Workplace Signage: Annexes I and III, Directive 92/58/EEC, last amended by Directive 2014/27/EU, 5 March 2014, EU. 7 and points 2 and 3 of the Annex to Directive 94/33/EC, to which young persons (under 18 years of age) may not be exposed at the workplace. The described Product category (i.e. Annex X to Directive 2000/60/EC, Priority Substances in the Field of Water Policy, as amended by Directive 2013/39/EU, OJ L 226/1, 24 August 2013, Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals, Chemical Agents Directive and Carcinogens or Mutagens Directive, Protection of Pregnant and Breastfeeding Workers Directive, RoHS - Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical & Electronic Equipment Directive, Safety and/or Health Signs at Work Directive, Water Environmental Quality Standards Directive, EC Inventory, PIC, Registration dossier, Pre-Registration process, Other, Substances of very high concern identification, Recommendation for the Authorisation List, Getting started with EU chemicals legislation, Classification of substances and mixtures, Harmonised classification and labelling (CLH). Prohibited Substances (Art. Table 3 of Annex VI to CLP Regulation); and (2) the Candidate List of substances of very high concern (SVHC). This has been a subject of considerable confusion in the past. The list includes 'priority hazardous substances' which are subject to special restrictions. While the harmonized list covers many hazardous substances, other ones not listed may also meet the classification criteria in accordance with the CLP. 4(1) Restrictions (Annexes III & IV), Directive 2011/65/EU (RoHS), as amended by 2020/366/EU, 5 March 2020, EU. This database contains: (1) the list of hazardous substances harmonized for classification and labeling in EU (i.e. According to the classification provided by companies to ECHA in REACH registrations this substance may damage fertility or the unborn child, is very toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects, is harmful if swallowed, is harmful if inhaled, is suspected of causing cancer and may cause damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure. A substance may have its use restricted to certain articles or products and therefore not all the examples may apply to the specific substance. Note that this list is not exhaustive. This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our websites. This substance is used for the manufacture of: metals. This directive requires employers to ensure proper signage is posted in areas where hazards cannot be avoided or reduced. Such notifications are required for hazardous substances, mixtures, or articles, manufactured or imported at over 1 kg per annum. Danger! Lead(II) hydroxide. For readability purpose, only non-confidential use descriptors occurring in more than 5% of total occurrences are displayed. The CLP Regulation ensures that the hazards presented by chemicals are clearly communicated to workers and consumers in the European Union through classification and labelling of chemicals. List entries include substance name, CAS number, limit values for certain product types and, where applicable, notes on restrictions.