BioNET-EAFRINET Regional Coordinator: eafrinet@africaonline.co.ke, Trogoderma granarium Everts, 1899 - Khapra Beetle. Males are 1.4-2.3mm long, 0.75-1.1mm wide; adult females are 2.1-3.4mm long, 1.7-1.9 mm wide. Biological control is effective against khapra beetle because naturel enemies only feed their host rather putting any damage to stored commodities. The Khapra beetle, while harmless to humans, is known as one of the most dangerous species in the world to grain crops with the ability to decimate huge stores of the product. Established infestations are difficult to control because of the beetle's ability to live without food for long periods of time and to survive on foods of low moistur… Previous U.S. detections of this tiny beetle have required massive, long-term and costly control and eradication efforts. Fumigation of grain stocks with phosphine or methyl bromide will control existing infestations but will not protect against re-infestation. Males are 1.4-2.3mm long, 0.75-1.1mm wide; adult females are 2.1-3.4mm long, 1.7-1.9 mm wide. (2006). © James D. Young, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org. It is supposed to be a major pest of wheat in Indian subcontinent and … The use of neem (Azadirachta indica) seed powder mixed into maize appears to be an effective and cheap method to control the pest in stored maize. The removal of adults and larvae from the grain by sieving can reduce populations but this is very labour-intensive. Controlled atmosphereWhere suitable infrastructure exists, low oxygen and carbon dioxide-enriched atmospheres can be used to control stored product pests. The khapra beetle is thought by some to be native to the Indian subcontinent. (1977). Its feeding damage often spoils 30 percent of the product; up to 70 percent damage has been reported. The Khapra beetle is not found in Australia and can be enormously destructive to grain crops. The larval stage however, can last from a month to a year, if it enters, The beetle does not bore into host material but young. Its feeding damage often spoils 30 percent of the product; up to 70 percent damage has been reported. How can I protect my farm from . The Khapra Beetle(Trogoderma granarium) is one of the world’s most destructive pests of stored grain products and seeds. Its feeding damage often spoils 30 percent of the product; up to 70 percent damage has been reported. High humidity slows down population increase. SW 185. damage symptoms. Invasive Species Specialist Group, World Conservation Union (IUCN). The khapra beetle produces between one and nine generations per year depending on factors such as the host species, temperature, light and moisture. It will not be in crops in the field. Trogoderma granarium. Khapra beetle (English); trogoderma du grain, dermeste du grain (French), Trogoderma khapra Arrow, 1917;Trogoderma affrum Priesner, 1951;Trogoderma quinquefasciata Leesberg, 1906, Phylum: Arthropoda; Class: Hexapoda (Insecta); Order: Coleoptera; Family: Dermestidae. Szito A. 0009. www.npdn.org/webfm_send/460 (accessed 18 June 2011). Khapra Beetle. Banks H.J. T. granarium has also been shown to decrease the mineral content of maize (Jood et al., 1992). Damage caused a loss in weight averaging 16.36% (Girish et al., 1975). Distribution and establishment of Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae); climatic and other influences. Larva. Stored Product Pests. Males are brown to black and females lighter. The tiny adult Khapra beetle (top) and juvenile larvae (bottom) pictured on grains of rice. 2000). Fruits, seeds, grains and pods: internal feeding; visible mould. The khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium Everts, 1898) (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). Khapra beetle is found in Africa, India, Russia . The eggs, which are loosely scattered in host material, hatch in 3-14 days.