It is important to leave the plant until it dies on its own because the leaves will collect energy for next year’s blooms. By: Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer. Lauren has worked for Aurora, Colorado managing the Water-Wise Garden at Aurora Municipal Center for the Water Conservation Department. This article has been viewed 56,675 times. This will damage them or promote early flowering. Next, store the bag in a cool, dry place that stays between 60-65°F, like your basement or garage. There are 19 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. Don’t rush; the green foliage absorbs sunlight, which provides energy the bulbs will use to create new blooms. Information On Storing Bulbs In Southern Climates, Crocus Bulb Storage: Learn How To Cure Crocus Bulbs, Dividing Daffodils: Can You Transplant Daffodil Bulbs, Fall Themed Fairy Gardens: How To Make A Mini-Thanksgiving Garden, Olive Preservation Guide: How Do You Brine Olives, Thanksgiving Flower Decor: DIY Floral Thanksgiving Arrangements, Komatsuna Plant Care: Tips On Growing Komatsuna Greens, Getting Pumpkin Blossoms – Why A Pumpkin Plant Is Not Flowering, Yellow Leaves On Petunia Plants: Why A Petunia Has Yellow Leaves, Katydid Facts: Managing Katydids In The Garden, The Bountiful Garden: Bringing The Garden To Thanksgiving, Overwintering Containers And End Of Season Cleanup, Must Have Winter Shrubs – Top 7 Shrubs For Winter Interest, Enclosed Porch Garden – Indoor Gardening On The Porch. Place them in a cool sunny window. With the correct preparation, you can have beautiful flowers next blooming season. Daffodil bulbs are extremely hardy bulbs that survive winters in the ground in all but the most punishing winters and hot summers. do; I'm sure I'll have nice blooms next season. Last Updated: April 24, 2020 Use your hands to brush excess soil from the daffodil bulbs. This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. You can also use a netted bag to help regulate airflow, but it will not block light. This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube. In the curing and storage of daffodil bulbs, brush off any dry soil, then place the dry bulbs in a ventilated bag, such as a mesh vegetable bag or a nylon stocking. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 56,675 times. With our brand new eBook, featuring our favorite DIY projects for the whole family, we really wanted to create a way to not only show our appreciation for the growing Gardening Know How community, but also unite our community to help every one of our neighbors in need during these unprecedented times. If you live north of USDA plant hardiness zone 3 or south of zone 7, it’s a good idea to store your daffodil bulbs during the off-season, a process also known as “curing.” Storage of daffodil bulbs is also a good idea if you want to replant the daffodils in a different location for the next blooming season. She earned a BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from Western Michigan University in 2014. Lift as many of the daffodil bulbs as you can with a garden fork. Any other time they can stay in the ground. Grow on as a houseplant and then move the bulbs to their permanent location outdoors once the damage of frost has passed. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Good locations for daffodil bulb storage include a garage or a cool, dry basement. For tips from our Horticultural reviewer on how to remove your bulbs from the ground before storing them, read on! "I was given some daffodil bulbs, but had no idea how to store them.After reading your article, I now know what to. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. Do not replant daffodils where you have found infected bulbs. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. There is a chance they may also get infected if you plant them in the same place. % of people told us that this article helped them. Store the bulbs for at least 6-8 weeks, then replant them in late December or early January so they’ll bloom in the spring. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Remove the wilted blooms, then leave the daffodils alone until the foliage dies down and turns brown. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. Place the bulbs into paper bags (or nets) and store them in a cool, dry place. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/d\/dc\/Store-Daffodil-Bulbs-Step-01.jpg\/v4-460px-Store-Daffodil-Bulbs-Step-01.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/d\/dc\/Store-Daffodil-Bulbs-Step-01.jpg\/aid5086888-v4-728px-Store-Daffodil-Bulbs-Step-01.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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