The small condenser mics strike a good balance but good ones are out of my range as well. The Shure SM48 has a respectable frequency response from 55-14,000 Hz. This has the advantage of not only providing phantom power, but you also tend to have better quality inputs than many audio interfaces. They are very delicate and require a phantom power to work. The SM48 is a cardioid dynamic, just like the Shure SM58. Phantom power is a way to provide power to microphones—that need electricity to operate, but that don’t have a dedicated AC power source. This unidirectional dynamic mic is designed for professional sound reinforcement, studio recording, and broadcasting. I bought a Scarlett Solo 2in2out 2nd interface and a Shure SM48 microphone thinking the two would work together. 50% and its barely audible. Will research if the solo focusrite can power it. Yeah i thought a preamp would solve it. Another option is to use an external power supply. But most dynamic mics, particularly modern ones are designed to be able to accept phantom power and simply not use it. The SM48 unidirectional dynamic microphone is a great performance microphone. SM48-LC without On/off switch and including a windscreen. If it can then it will be a stopgap until i level up to a small condenser mic. However, on recording through audacity I find the recorded audio to be rather low on volume despite my macs volume on the loudest setting. Phantom power is a way to provide power to microphones—that need electricity to operate, but that don’t have a dedicated AC power source. New interface? Really appreciate you confirming my suspicions about this combo. It has an almost completely flat frequency response and just gives you whatever you put in front of it. They are specifically designed for cleanly boosting the level of a dynamic mic on quiet sources. This article will explain what phantom power is and why the SM58 does not need it, whether or not phantom power can harm a dynamic microphone, and what the Shure … (Unlikely with modern mics but does sometimes happen). However, some older mixers and cheaper audio interfaces may not have phantom power. Ive just researched a little more and found the Pyle PDMIC58 ($20~$30). (https://marco.org/podcasting-microphones). If I've made a mistake what are some buying options to fix this? In this case, an external phantom power supply can be added between the condenser mic and the preamp. This is a 2nd preamp that goes inline with the first. The power can be provided by a battery located inside of the mic; an example is the Shure PG81 (now discontinued) that operates from a single AA battery. On the other hand, dynamic mics—the ubiquitous Shure SM57 and SM58 mics, for example—do not require power. But that's more money sunk in. The Shure PG48 has a frequency response from 70 … I wanted a dynamic mic because they suit my use case; recording solo programming screencasts on my noisy keyboard in my echoey bedroom. This is what I would do on a low budget in your situation. You turn on phantom power, and the FETHead converts that phantom power into more gain for a dynamic mic. It is only natural to think that running power into something that doesn’t need it will probably break it. The GSP2101 and synthesizers mentioned above are a good example of things that could be fried by coming into contact with phantom power. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast, More posts from the microphones community, Press J to jump to the feed. A dynamic microphone, like the SM58, does not require phantom power because it does not have active electronics inside. These tend to sound a bit harsh, as cheap cardioid condenser mics will have a resonant peak somewhere between 10kHz-20kHz. The same cannot be said about condenser microphones. Get rid of the SM48 and buy a cheap condenser mic instead, something like a behringer c1 or one of many similar chinese LDCs. Whilst dynamic microphones don’t require phantom power to operate, this does not mean phantom power will damage them. The 58 is a little better for live acts, and more professional application, but the 48 holds it’s own quite well. What makes the SM48 interesting, however, is that on a certain voice (read: my voice), it cal kill the SM58. The Shure SM48 does not need a phantom power to work effectively. The Shure SM48 is built like a tank, not unlike the SM58. An EQ cut will fix that but you need good ears. The Shure SM48-LC Microphone offers many of the same qualities as the famous SM58 but at a lower price. (Unlikely with modern mics but does sometimes happen). The Shure PG48 is the extreme budget vocal microphone for someone who apparently does not care about sound. It is "inspired" by the AKG C414, but new, modern AKG C414s are not very good at all. They pick up too much noise. They are specifically designed for cleanly boosting the level of a dynamic mic on quiet sources. In the best case it literally won't do anything, in the worst case it could cause some damage. Buy something like a Triton Audio FETHead. Get rid of the SM48 and buy a cheap condenser mic instead, something like a behringer c1 or one of many similar chinese LDCs. Speak a LOT closer into the mic. No, the Shure SM58 microphone does not require phantom power simply because it does not have any active circuitry within it. A condenser would pick far too much up and the Shure fell within budget. Will Phantom Power Damage my Dynamic Mics? Turning on phantom power doesn't seem to make a difference. Either way, the risk is not to the mixer, only the gear you would plug into it. You turn on phantom power, and the FETHead converts that phantom power into more gain for a dynamic mic. Ive read that large condenser mics dont sound great in your standard bedroom with pc whirring and keys clattering away (my exact environment). Your options are: Speak a LOT closer into the mic. This is because it is a dynamic microphone and can function without an external power source. You would need to get a … Don't use phantom power on a dynamic mic. Alternatively (and most commonly) the DC power is provided by the pre-amp/mixer and delivered to the condenser microphone via the mic cable. Thanks mate! On the other hand, dynamic mics—the ubiquitous Shure SM57 and SM58 mics, for example—do not require power. The tailored frequency response is ideal for … My mouth is right next to the mic speaking into the top. If you have a higher budget, buy an SE Electronics 4400a ii. It's a cheap low gain dynamic mic with great sound quality (relative to its price) and apparently can be powered by most inexpensive interfaces. http://www.shure.com/americas/products/microphones/sm/sm48-vocal-microphone, https://us.focusrite.com/usb-audio-interfaces/scarlett-solo. You would need to get a pop filter and put it in front of your stand. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. This is, in my opinion, the best microphone that you can possibly buy for general-purpose recording, beating out mics that I own that cost more than 10 times as much.